All posts by Marc Hanheide

Robotics Research Seminar 24/5/17: “Making Robust SLAM Solvers for Autonomous Mobile Robots”

We invite everybody to attend the robotics research seminar, organised by L-CAS, on Wednesday 24/5/2017:

grisettiDr Giorgio Grisetti, DIAG, University of Rome “Sapienza”:

Making Robust SLAM Solvers for Autonomous Mobile Robots

  • WHERE: AAD1W11, Lecture Theatre (Art, Architecture and Design Building), Brayford Pool Campus
  • WHEN: Wednesday 24th May 2017, 3:00 – 4:00 pm

ABSTRACT:

In robotics, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) is the computational problem of constructing or updating a map of an unknown environment while simultaneously keeping track of an agent’s location within it.

SLAM is an essential enabling technology for building truly autonomous robots that can operate in an unknown environment. The last three decades have seen substantial research in the field and modern SLAM systems are able to cope easily with operating conditions that in the past were regarded as challenging if not impossible to deal with.

This consideration might support the statement that SLAM is a closed problem. However a closer look at the contributions presented in the most relevant conferences and journals in robotics reveals that the papers on SLAM are still numerous and the community is large. Would this be the case if an off-the shelf solution that works all the time were available?

Non-experts that approach the problem, or even want to get one of the state-of-the-art systems running, often encounter problems and get performances that are far from the ones reported in the papers.  This is usually because the person using the system is not the person designing the system.  An open box approach that aims at solving the problems by modifying an existing pipeline is often hard to implement due to the complexity of modern SLAM systems.

In this talk we will overview the history of SLAM and we will outline some of the challenges in designing robust SLAM systems, and most importantly forming robust SLAM solvers.

Furthermore, we will also present PRO-SLAM (SLAM from a programmer’s perspective), a simplistic open-source pipeline that competes with state-of-the art Stereo Visual SLAM systems while focusing on simplicity to support teaching.

https://gitlab.com/srrg-software/srrg_proslam

Research Seminar 11/7/16: Experiences from Introducing a Robot into a Geriatric Long Term Care Environment

SoCS Research Seminar

Caregiver 4.0 – Experiences from Introducing a Robot into a Geriatric Long Term Care Environment

 

Time: Monday, 11/7/16, 2pm

Place: MC0020

Abstract

henry-at-aafIn my talk, I would like to give an overview of our scientific work that we conduct within the STRANDS-project, where the School of Computer Science of the University of Lincoln is also part of.

Due to demographic changes that lead to an ageing society, a shortage of care provision is anticipated. As a probable solution technical aids for enhancing independent living of older adults and for supporting staff in the elder care sector are proposed. But technical aids often lack required autonomy and were so far primarily tested in lab situations. Thus, the STRANDS –project came to live with the aim to develop a long-term autonomous learning robotic system that can be actually deployed in elder care and in other work environments under “real-world conditions” over longer periods of time.

Besides the technical challenges associated with such an endeavour, different questions were raised:  What does staff in the elder care sector require from a robotic aid? In what areas could we deploy our STRANDS-robot in real world conditions? How would older adults and care staff experience interacting or working with the robot? What ethical guidelines have to be met when introducing a robotic aid in such an environment? And what could the future with such robotic aids look like in elder care? Questions that will be addressed in this presentation.

 

Biography

Denise Hebesberger
Denise Hebesberger, AAF, Vienna

Denise Hebesberger studied Biology (grad. 2013) and Educational Science (grad. 2012) at the University of Vienna. After graduation and working in different fields of science, she joined the Academy for Research on Ageing as a project manager in 2014. The Academy is social science partner within different EU-wide research consortia that develop technical aids and assistive systems for older adults or for the care sector and study their impact in terms of social acceptance and human-robot interaction on end users. She is responsible for establishing theoretical frameworks, evaluation designs and data analysis (mixed methods designs & structural equation modelling), as well as dissemination of research results and scientific publications.

Research Seminar 15/02/16 2pm, in MB1020: Dr Michael Mangan

After Dr Cuayahuitl and Dr Baxter, who gave research presentations recently, we are now happy to announce a research seminar by the third colleague to join the Lincoln Centre for Autonomous Systems soon as a Senior Lecturer.

M_Mangan_2_small
Dr Michael Mangan

On 15/02/16, at 2pm, in room MB1020 (1st floor, Minerva Building), Dr Michael Mangan, currently still at the University of Edinburgh, will be presenting his exciting research. Everybody is invited to join in.

 

 

Title

What can self-driving cars learn from the humble desert ant?  And how are those lessons learned?

Abstract

Desert ants are amongst the most impressive of the animal navigators: expertly piloting through complex environments despite possessing low-resolution eyes and tiny brains. As such they are an ideal model system for bio-roboticists that seek to understand these amazing animals, as well as those seeking novel solutions for engineering goals such as autonomous navigation.  In this talk I shall firstly introduce the animal of interest (the desert ant) describing their amazing navigational capabilities.  I will then briefly describe some recent examples for which our bio-robotic approach has lead to advances in understanding of the biological system and novel applications in autonomous systems (such as self-driving cars).  I shall close by looking ahead to the research I shall be pursuing after joining the University of Lincoln this spring.

 

SoCS Research Seminar 12/2/16 2pm MB1020: From Autonomous Robots to Autonomous Cars

Dr Frederic Siepmann

Frederic Siepmann, a development specialist at BMW R&D will present in our School of Computer Science research seminar series on 12/02/16 at 2pm. His talk will take place in seminar room MB1020 (1st floor Minerva Building). Frederic will share his journey from being an academic working on autonomous robots to eventually become a developer in car autonomy and assistance, providing some insights into this career path and the latest development in the field at BMW.

BMW 7er
RoboCup Logo

Title: From Autonomous Robots to Autonomous Cars – How My RoboCup Experience helped me build Software for the new BMW 7 Series

 

Abstract:

Coming from the research area of autonomous robots and now working in the automotive industry, my talk covers some of the technological challenges as well as software engineering challenges when developing highly complex and software-intensive systems.

I will give you a short overview about lessons learned from the development of autonomous robots and how the iterative development process as e.g. performed during the RoboCup@HOME tournament helped me find my way in the automotive industry.

Also, I will show some of the current technologies in driver assistance, point out similarities and differences and dare to give a short glimpse into the future.