Tag Archives: School of Computer Science

The new home of of Computer Science at University of Lincoln

The University of Lincoln recently invested £28m to create the Isaac Newton Building – the new home for our School of Computer Science. We join the Schools of Engineering and Maths & Physics in this stunning new setting.

The new building is named after one of Lincolnshire’s greatest sons, Sir Isaac Newton PRS MP, who was born at Woolsthorpe Manor near Grantham.

Current students entered a competition set by the University, which was to create a piece of art for the large signature wall in the Isaac Newton Building. Over 30 entries were received from seven different schools across the University representing a wide range of disciplines.

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The large scale artwork is now in-situ

The judging panel deliberated hard, finally selecting an entry created by level one Creative Advertising students Amelia Eddershaw and Orlagh Smith as the winning piece. The judges felt their submission had interpreted the brief creatively and in doing so had presented a dynamic, engaging piece with the high level of impact that the panel was looking for.

The artwork is visible to people making their way to the University from Tritton Road.

This artwork competition has clearly demonstrated the impressive talent available in the University of Lincoln student community and the competition organisers and judging panel would like to extend thanks to all those who took part. An exhibition of the best entries will be on display in the University Library from April 2017.

Save the date: Upcoming must-see seminars

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We’ve got some great seminars coming up in the School of Computer Science, so put these dates in your diary and we’ll see you there.

First up next week we have a seminar on ‘Visual mining – interpreting image and video‘ with speaker Professor Stefan Rüger from the Knowledge Media Institute, The Open University, UK.

The seminar will start at 2pm on Tuesday 26th January in MB1013, Minerva Building. No need to book, just come along.

This talk highlights recent important technical advances in automated media understanding, which has a variety of applications ranging from machines emulating the human aesthetic judgment of photographs to typical visual mining tasks such as analysing food images.

Highlighted techniques include near-duplicate detection, multimedia indexing and the role of machine learning. The talk will end by looking into the crystal ball exploring what machines might learn from automatically analysing tens of thousands of hours of TV footage.”

We also have a fascinating seminar on ‘Guaranteed delivery systems for online advertising‘ on Wednesday 3rd February at 3pm till 4pm. Please come to MC0024, we look forward to seeing you there.

“Online advertising has become a significant source of revenue for publishers and search engines. One important business model in online advertising is the so-called non-guaranteed delivery (NGD) system, in which advertisers purchase their targeted advertisement inventories like page views or link clicks on the spot market through an auction mechanism.

Despite the success of the NGD system, it has several limitations including the uncertainty in the buyer’s payment, the volatility in the seller’s revenue, and the weak loyalty between buyer and seller. To alleviate these problems, guaranteed delivery (GD) systems have been recently studied in which advertisers are able to secure their targeted future deliveries through standardised or customised contracts.

In this presentation, we will discuss several GD systems that we have developed. “

We look forward to seeing you there so you can join in the conversation. 

Click here to keep up to date with all our seminars in the School of Computer Science

First workshop for Performance and Games Network

The first of three workshops for a new research project looking at creating new videogames will take place this week.

Led by the Games Research Group at the University of Lincoln, the Performance and Games Network involves several researchers from Lincoln’s School of Computer Science, including Dr Patrick Dickinson, Dr Duncan Rowland, Dr Conor Linehan, Dr Ben Kirman, Dr John Shearer and Kathrin Gerling, working with Dr Kate Sicchio from the School of Performing Arts and Dr Grethe Mitchell from the School of Media.

The first session, which will bring together games developers, performance practitioners and academics, will be hosted by the University on 25th and 26th March.

Themed around movement and gesture based input devices, the core of the activity will be centred around a “hack” style event in which participants will work in small groups on design and/or prototyping exercises around a number of sub-themes and software.

Some of the sub-themes include mobility impaired performance; physical games in playgrounds; and audience and movement games.

Experts in the field will also be giving special talks. Guests include Ida Toft and Sabine Harrer from Copenhagen Game Collective at IT University, Copenhagen; Nick Burton from Rare Ltd; David Renton from Microsoft; and Matt Watkins from Mudlark.

The research group is also collaborating with Performance and New Media Professor Gabriella Giannachi, from the University of Exeter, and Arts Queensland, based in Brisbane.

The project is being sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) as part of a wider initiative to develop the creative industries and put Britain back at the forefront of creative technology.

There will be two more inter-disciplinary workshops in Nottingham, UK, and Brisbane, Australia, where researchers working in games studies, human computer interaction and technical aspects of game development will continue to work with developers and performance researchers/practitioners to prototype new collaborative game ideas.

Performer on keyboard

New academics join team of computer scientists

Two specialists in human-computer interaction have joined the growing team at the University of Lincoln’s School of Computer Science.

Dr John Shearer and Kathrin Gerling will be continuing their research into interactive technologies that have a purpose beyond entertainment.

Ms Gerling is particularly interested in how motion-based interfaces can be used by people with special needs and her award-winning research on wheelchair-based game input has been presented at top international venues.

By modifying a Microsoft Kinect sensor, Ms Gerling demonstrated how gamers in a wheelchair could interact with motion games. The modification that she made to the Kinect meant that the system could take into account the position and movement of the wheelchair.

Ms Gerling, who will teach on the Games and Social Computing programmes, said: “Some wheelchair-bound patients at nursing homes and other long-term care facilities could benefit from the exercise and entertainment provided by gaming. Commercial technologies don’t really think about these user groups but these games could be a lot more inclusive and benefit society as a whole.

“I would like to create games that help people get better at using wheelchairs, particularly those who have suffered disability as a result of an accident. People struggle a lot more to accept their situation and get used to their assistive device if it happens later in life. It’s nice to be able to help to improve people’s quality of life.”

She is now looking to make contact with local groups who provide support for people with disabilities.

Dr Shearer’s work focusses on engaging the public in ‘creative play’ and understanding how people interact with computers.

He has recently revived his interest in live performance through his work on the humanaquarium – a moveable performance space designed to explore the relationship between artist and audience.

The project involved two musicians working with audience members to create an audio-visual performance using a touch sensitive transparent screen. The humanaquarium was designed to be in a public place, so people could discover and explore the installation, encouraging them to share in the experience of creative play.

Dr Shearer, who will teach graphics and games programming, said: “I approach human-computer interaction from a slightly different perspective – that of how people interact with the finished product, not how it is created. I take a more experience-based approach to designing collaborative interactive performance.

“You usually test software in a nice, safe environment such as a laboratory. That alters people’s reaction as it is a very clinical place. You need to put the technology out there in a public space so the understanding and reaction from people is a lot more realistic.”

Dr Shearer is now looking to create more installations in public spaces and is involved with the School of Computer Science’s Videogames Research Network, set up to explore new concepts in the design and creation of movement-based games.

Kathrin Gerling

 

humanaquarium