Tag Archives: lincoln

From 3D-printed blacksmith artefacts to proton therapy

LiGHTS Nights is coming to Lincoln and the School of Computer Science is putting on a variety of workshops and lectures you don’t want to miss.

Produce real blacksmith artefacts with the latest 3D-printer technology, find out how Lincoln research is improving proton therapy for cancer sufferers, and get up close and personal with our all-seeing robots, all for LiGHTS Nights on September 30th.

Computer Science does Lights Nights
Computer Science to showcase 3D printing, robotics and proton therapy research
More than 40 scientific workshops, talks and exhibitions will take place as part of the action-packed LiGHTS Nights (Lincoln – Get Hold of Tech and Science) event, which will invite people of all ages to learn more about research projects that are changing the world we live in today.
LiGHTS Nights – a celebration of how science and technology impacts on our daily lives –will take place on the University of Lincoln’s Brayford Pool campus and in venues across the city.
Visitors to LiGHTS Nights will be introduced to Lincoln’s ensemble cast of robots – the focus of exciting studies into artificial intelligence – and invited to experience the latest developments in Virtual Reality, the technology trend taking the world by storm.
Get 3D-printing real blacksmith artefacts from 12-6pm in the Minerva Building, Atrium with Dr John Murray.
A workshop called ‘See Humans Through a Robot’s Eyes’ will run at 1pm, 4pm and 7pm throughout the day in the LLMC Lecture Theatre, David Chiddick Building with Dr Marc Hanheide.
Professor Nigel Allinson will give an insightful talk into his Proton Therapy research: ‘A positive beam of hope for cancer treatments’ at 3pm in the Stephen Langton Lecture Theatre (Emmtec).
LiGHTS Nights is free to attend but bookings for individual sessions should be made in advance. More more information is available and bookings can be made online.

European Researchers’ Night is an annual Europe-wide initiative that takes place on the last Friday of September. The Lincoln showcase is one of more than 250 events occurring simultaneously in major cities across the continent this year, each inviting members of the public to meet ‘heroes of science’; the researchers from different disciplines whose work has the potential to change our world.

LiGHTS Nights will see academics from the University’s Colleges of Science, Arts and Social Science present their pioneering studies and invite visitors to become scientists for the day by participating in a range of different activities and experiments.

The programme of events, which features exhibitions, tours, public lectures, workshops, screenings and performances, begins at 11am and runs until 10pm. Visitors are encouraged to attend several events and make the most of the variety of activities on offer.

Read the full article here

 

Simplify travelling round Lincoln with Lincoln Bus

Travelling on a bus in Lincoln just got easier thanks to a website created by a University of Lincoln student.

Lincoln Bus Website

Lincoln Bus has been created by third year Computer Science student Jacob Ellis and is an all-in-one bus timetable viewer for travelling around Lincoln. The website hopes to help people check all bus services, routes and departure and arrival times.

Jacob Ellis said: “Lincoln Bus does the work for you, select your bus service and your current location and then it will show you an estimated time for your next bus, plus all other bus departures from your location throughout the day.

“Bus timetables can often be confusing especially with long haul journeys or services where departures are at different times on different days of the week.”

Jacob built the site using the programming skills he’d learnt during his Computer Science degree and says it’s helped him to set up the bus timetable database and website.

“There’s a lot of programming in Computer Science and as such the course has taught me how to teach myself other programming languages.” He said.

Lincoln Bus is predominantly programmed in PHP for web browsers, but I hope to release an Android app later. The database was made using SQL and the data is displayed to the user using SQL queries buried in PHP code.”

lincolnbus2

The website gives you the option to find bus routes depending on your location and you can choose whether you’re travelling from Lincoln or to the city.

The Lincoln Bus logo, created by Fine Art and Illustration student Bryony Loveridge, features the Lincoln skyline including the Cathedral, Lincoln Castle and other city landmarks.

The site gives you a variety of bus routes all in one place, and clicking on this with your location will give you the next bus time and the rest of the services for that day.

Jacob added: “My website recognises days of the week. So, for example if it is a Sunday, the estimated time box will display only the Sunday service timings throughout the day with the code ‘S’ to remind users that this journey is applicable only on a Sunday.

“Sometimes a bus service doesn’t run its full route. For example, the Service 1 Lincoln to Grantham at every other iteration goes as far as Wellingore, sometimes only Waddington if it’s a Sunday. In cases like this, Lincoln Bus will display a message such as WADDINGTON ONLY to show users that their next bus is not a full service.”

The website is currently in beta testing stage, but all Lincoln bus services will be added over the next few months along with new features users are to look forward too.

“The Journey Planner feature would allow the user to see their bus services and departures timings for multiple locations. For bus users new to the bus services in Lincoln, I am planning to add a feature whereby they select their location and the website displays which bus service they need as currently the user will need to know their bus service to make use of the website. This will be added as part of the Journey Planner.”

Jacob even hopes to include traffic information from Google to improve the estimated arrival and departure times in case of Lincoln congestion.

Great work Jacob – check out the site here and catch your bus with Lincolnbus.co.uk  

Postdoc to give a talk at a world-leading AI lab in America

A School of Computer Science STRANDS postdoc has been invited to give a presentation at a world-leading Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab in the USA.

Dr Tomas Krajnik, in L-CAS will give a talk next week at MIT: Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in Cambridge, USA on ‘FreMEn: Frequency Map Enhancement for Long-Term Autonomy of Mobile Robots’.

Tom is a research fellow at the Lincoln Center of Autonomous Systems. He has a PhD degree in Artificial Intelligence and Biocybernetics from the Czech Technical University, Prague, Czech Republic, in 2012. His research interests include long-term autonomy, robot vision and aerial robotics.

This is an amazing opportunity for him to present the work of the STRANDS project to an American audience and we will keep you informed on how the talk goes.

Abstract:

While robotic mapping of static environments has been widely studied,life-long mapping in non-stationary environments is still an open problem. We present an approach for long-term representation of natural environments, where many of the observed changes are caused by pseudo-periodic factors, such as seasonal variations, or humans performing their daily chores.

Rather than using a fixed probability value, our method models the uncertainty of the elementary environment states by their frequency spectra. This allows to integrate sparse and irregular observations obtained during long-term deployments of mobile robots into memory-efficient models that reflect the recurring patterns of activity in the environment.

The frequency-enhanced spatio-temporal models allow to predict the future environment states, which improves the efficiency of mobile robot operation in changing environments. In a series of
experiments performed over periods of weeks to years, we demonstrate that the proposed approach improves mobile robot localization, path and task planning, activity recognition and allows for life-long spatio-temporal exploration.

STRANDS