Tag Archives: Games Computing

Students receive personal invitation to RAF Metheringham

Alex Curtis and Raymond Kirk, students at the School of Computer Science, were delighted to receive an invite to visit RAF Metheringham in Lincolnshire.

Alex was contacted by RAF Metheringham after delegates had seen his Lancaster simulation game at the School of  Computer Science showcase event in May 2017.

Find out what Alex said about his experience: 

The attendees from RAF Metheringham were intrigued by my project as Metheringham was the home of 106 Squadron, primarily a Lancaster base. Furthermore, 59 Lancaster Bombers were lost from RAF Metheringham and there is a poignant exhibit in the wartime gymnasium to commemorate those aircraft and crews lost.

School of Computer Science Annual Showcase 2017. Image: Electric Egg
School of Computer Science Annual Showcase 2017. Image: Electric Egg

They had been interested in creating an interactive exhibit, which demonstrates how to perform each of the crew roles: Pilots; Navigator; Flight Engineer; Mid Gunner; Rear Gunner; Bomber Aim and Wireless Operator to educate the public, especially the younger generation. With the aid of an interactive exhibit the education of topics such as Morse keys and RAF crew, roles will become more engaging and interesting for the users.

Myself and fellow student, Raymond Kirk, are currently completing an interactive mirror project for display at the International Bomber Command Centre (IBCC). This initially started as a summer project which the School’s Bruce Hargrave facilitated, subsequently introducing us to the IBCC curators. Bruce also helped provide support throughout the project. Since we are close to finishing the IBCC project, we decided to collaborate on new exhibits at Metheringham as we enjoy working together. The skills we’ve learnt whilst studying the Computer Science and Games Computing programmes at the University of Lincoln really complement one another.

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When visiting RAF Metheringham, we were shown around the vast array of artefacts and exhibits the site had to offer. We especially enjoyed going inside a Dakota plane and learnt what the plane’s role was during the war and learning how it was made and functioned. We showed Metheringham the prototype mirror we had created for the IBCC and the Lancaster simulation game. They really liked the demonstrations and this was important for us to show, as it allowed Metheringham to see the type of exhibits we can create. 

Myself and Raymond are looking at setting up a business to aid our future projects and have been in touch with careers to start the process.”

Find out more about RAF Metheringham online.

New academics join team of computer scientists

Two specialists in human-computer interaction have joined the growing team at the University of Lincoln’s School of Computer Science.

Dr John Shearer and Kathrin Gerling will be continuing their research into interactive technologies that have a purpose beyond entertainment.

Ms Gerling is particularly interested in how motion-based interfaces can be used by people with special needs and her award-winning research on wheelchair-based game input has been presented at top international venues.

By modifying a Microsoft Kinect sensor, Ms Gerling demonstrated how gamers in a wheelchair could interact with motion games. The modification that she made to the Kinect meant that the system could take into account the position and movement of the wheelchair.

Ms Gerling, who will teach on the Games and Social Computing programmes, said: “Some wheelchair-bound patients at nursing homes and other long-term care facilities could benefit from the exercise and entertainment provided by gaming. Commercial technologies don’t really think about these user groups but these games could be a lot more inclusive and benefit society as a whole.

“I would like to create games that help people get better at using wheelchairs, particularly those who have suffered disability as a result of an accident. People struggle a lot more to accept their situation and get used to their assistive device if it happens later in life. It’s nice to be able to help to improve people’s quality of life.”

She is now looking to make contact with local groups who provide support for people with disabilities.

Dr Shearer’s work focusses on engaging the public in ‘creative play’ and understanding how people interact with computers.

He has recently revived his interest in live performance through his work on the humanaquarium – a moveable performance space designed to explore the relationship between artist and audience.

The project involved two musicians working with audience members to create an audio-visual performance using a touch sensitive transparent screen. The humanaquarium was designed to be in a public place, so people could discover and explore the installation, encouraging them to share in the experience of creative play.

Dr Shearer, who will teach graphics and games programming, said: “I approach human-computer interaction from a slightly different perspective – that of how people interact with the finished product, not how it is created. I take a more experience-based approach to designing collaborative interactive performance.

“You usually test software in a nice, safe environment such as a laboratory. That alters people’s reaction as it is a very clinical place. You need to put the technology out there in a public space so the understanding and reaction from people is a lot more realistic.”

Dr Shearer is now looking to create more installations in public spaces and is involved with the School of Computer Science’s Videogames Research Network, set up to explore new concepts in the design and creation of movement-based games.

Kathrin Gerling

 

humanaquarium

 

 

Games Computing commended in the Student Union Awards 2013

We are pleased to announce that Games Computing were commended in the Student Union Awards 2013 for the Best Course Award.

The recent upgrade of  facilities for this course has been greatly appreciated by students. The exemplary use of blackboard as a timely communication tool particularly stood out to the panel as a leading example of how virtual learning spaces can be used effectively.