Tag Archives: Dr Marc Hanheide

From 3D-printed blacksmith artefacts to proton therapy

LiGHTS Nights is coming to Lincoln and the School of Computer Science is putting on a variety of workshops and lectures you don’t want to miss.

Produce real blacksmith artefacts with the latest 3D-printer technology, find out how Lincoln research is improving proton therapy for cancer sufferers, and get up close and personal with our all-seeing robots, all for LiGHTS Nights on September 30th.

Computer Science does Lights Nights
Computer Science to showcase 3D printing, robotics and proton therapy research
More than 40 scientific workshops, talks and exhibitions will take place as part of the action-packed LiGHTS Nights (Lincoln – Get Hold of Tech and Science) event, which will invite people of all ages to learn more about research projects that are changing the world we live in today.
LiGHTS Nights – a celebration of how science and technology impacts on our daily lives –will take place on the University of Lincoln’s Brayford Pool campus and in venues across the city.
Visitors to LiGHTS Nights will be introduced to Lincoln’s ensemble cast of robots – the focus of exciting studies into artificial intelligence – and invited to experience the latest developments in Virtual Reality, the technology trend taking the world by storm.
Get 3D-printing real blacksmith artefacts from 12-6pm in the Minerva Building, Atrium with Dr John Murray.
A workshop called ‘See Humans Through a Robot’s Eyes’ will run at 1pm, 4pm and 7pm throughout the day in the LLMC Lecture Theatre, David Chiddick Building with Dr Marc Hanheide.
Professor Nigel Allinson will give an insightful talk into his Proton Therapy research: ‘A positive beam of hope for cancer treatments’ at 3pm in the Stephen Langton Lecture Theatre (Emmtec).
LiGHTS Nights is free to attend but bookings for individual sessions should be made in advance. More more information is available and bookings can be made online.

European Researchers’ Night is an annual Europe-wide initiative that takes place on the last Friday of September. The Lincoln showcase is one of more than 250 events occurring simultaneously in major cities across the continent this year, each inviting members of the public to meet ‘heroes of science’; the researchers from different disciplines whose work has the potential to change our world.

LiGHTS Nights will see academics from the University’s Colleges of Science, Arts and Social Science present their pioneering studies and invite visitors to become scientists for the day by participating in a range of different activities and experiments.

The programme of events, which features exhibitions, tours, public lectures, workshops, screenings and performances, begins at 11am and runs until 10pm. Visitors are encouraged to attend several events and make the most of the variety of activities on offer.

Read the full article here

 

Robot Linda making an impression

Linda the robot is generating a great deal of interest at the Universities Week event at the Natural  History Museum in London.

The specialist  mobile robot is one  of six currently being programmed to act intelligently in real-world environments, with the ultimate aim of being able to support security guards or staff in care homes.

She is one of six robots involved in the £7.2 million collaborative STRANDS project aimed at creating mobile robots that are able to operate independently, based on an understanding of 3D space and how this space changes over time.

Linda was invited to take part in Universities UK week-long celebration of university research and can be seen in the Darwin Centre of the Museum until Friday, 13th June.

The project has generated a great deal of media interest, including from Times Higher Education  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wm91a9OnThU&list=UUquqZYSjbdTsTGRzex9o_8g and the British Council http://www.educationuk.org/global/articles/universities-week-lincoln-university-robot-of-the-future-linda/

The open evening, attended by journalists and UK university representatives, involved demonstrations thanks to Dr Marc Hanheide, Dr Jaime Pulido Fentanes and Christian Dondrup.

The exhibit is just one of a number being hosted by the Natural History Museum as part of Universities Week 2014.

Linda NHM 9 Linda NHM 7 Linda NHM 5

Linda at the Natural History Museum
Linda at the Natural History Museum

Robot Linda will mingle with visitors at the Natural History Museum

Members of the public will have the opportunity to meet Linda the robot at a week-long celebration of university research at the Natural History Museum in London.

Linda is a specialist mobile robot currently being programmed to act intelligently in real-world environments, with the ultimate aim of being able to support security guards or staff in care homes.

She is one of six robots involved in the £7.2 million collaborative STRANDS project aimed at creating mobile robots that are able to operate independently, based on an understanding of 3D space and how this space changes over time.

Linda, who is based at the University of Lincoln, UK, and named after the city’s Roman roots as Lindum Colonia, will be mingling with visitors to the Museum from 9th to 13th June in the ‘Robots on Patrol’ exhibit.

The event is part of Universities Week 2014 which aims to increase public awareness of the wide and varied role of the UK’s universities.

It will be an opportunity for the research team to showcase the robot, which has already learned to map a building and run for 30 days autonomously.

Funded by the European Union’s Seventh Framework programme (FP7), the research project involves six academic partners, a security company and an Austrian care home provider, where the technology will be tested.

The robots will eventually be deployed to run for an extended time so they have the chance to develop an understanding of how the world should appear and be able to identify deviations from their normal environment.

Dr Marc Hanheide, from the University of Lincoln’s School of Computer Science, will be on hand throughout the week to explain Linda’s capabilities.

He said: “The aim is to show members of the public how this sort of technology could help us in our everyday lives, assisting humans in basic activities allowing them to concentrate on more important aspects of their work.

“It’s not just about providing a care home or security robot. We are trying to enable robots to learn from their long-term experience and their perception of how the environment unfolds in time. It will have many possible applications and taking Linda to the Natural History Museum is a fantastic opportunity for people to see how robots like this will, one day, be able to aid and assist humans in a variety of roles.”

The exhibit is just one of a number being hosted by the Natural History Museum as part of Universities Week 2014.
Linda was also one of the star attractions at the high-profile Longitude Prize 2014 launch at New Broadcasting House in London.

Linda
Linda

Linda the robot featured on BBC’s The One Show

Specialist robot Linda appeared on The One Show on Monday, 19th May.

Linda, who lives at the University, was in London at the launch of the Longitude Prize 2014 – a challenge with a multi-million pound prize fund to help solve one of the greatest issues of our time.

She is one of six specialist mobile robots involved in the £7.2 million collaborative STRANDS project aimed at creating robots that are able to operate independently and ultimately support security guards or staff in care homes.

Linda will be accompanied by Dr Marc Hanheide from the University of Lincoln’s School of Computer Science, who is leading the research on how the robots gather information about their surroundings.

Go to http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b04400lh/the-one-show-19052014 to watch the show.

Linda
Linda

University robot invited to launch of prestigious Longitude Prize

Linda the robot was one of the star attractions at the high-profile Longitude Prize 2014 launch, which aims to help solve one of the greatest issues of our time.

Linda is one of six specialist mobile robots involved in the £7.2 million collaborative STRANDS project aimed at creating robots that are able to operate independently and ultimately support security guards or staff in care homes.

Based at the University of Lincoln, UK, Linda was invited to attend New Broadcasting House in London for the official launch of the Longitude Prize on Monday, 19th May.

In 1714 the British government threw down the gauntlet to solve one of the great scientific challenges of that century – how to pinpoint a ship’s location at sea by knowing its longitude.

Longitude Prize 2014 is a challenge with a multi-million pound prize fund to help solve one of the greatest challenges we’re facing today. It is being run and developed by Nesta, the UK’s innovation foundation.

Linda will be accompanied by Dr Marc Hanheide from the University of Lincoln’s School of Computer Science and Dr Nick Hawes from the University of Birmingham, who are collaborating on the STRANDS project.

Dr Hanheide, whose background is in Artificial Intelligence, is leading the research on how the robots gather information about their surroundings, and use this learned knowledge to interact appropriately with human users.

Dr Hanheide said: “It was fantastic to be asked to show off Linda at this hugely prestigious event. Two of the other robots are currently at G4S Technology in Tewksbury, UK, and the care facility Haus der Barmherzigkeit in Vienna, Austria, so we will soon be able to see how effective they are in real-world environments and use this data to develop their future learning models.”

Other partners in the STRANDS project include Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden); RWTH Aachen University (Germany); The Vienna University of Technology (Austria) and University of Leeds (UK).

Linda will be continuing her travels in June 2014, watch this space for details!

 

Linda and Dr Marc Hanheide
Linda and Dr Marc Hanheide