Tag Archives: Dr Georgios Tzimiropoulos

Research presented at international computer vision conference

Two papers from academics in the School of Computer Science were presented at the world’s premier computer vision event.

The CVPR conference, which took place between June 24-27 in Ohio, is the highest-ranked venue in Computer Science.

According to Google Scholar Metrics, it is also the top publication venue in the field of computer vision and pattern recognition.

This year the University of Lincoln’s School of Computer Science was represented with two papers.

The first is ‘Gauss-Newton Deformable Part Models for Face Alignment in-the-Wild’ by Dr Georgios Tzimiropoulos and Maja Pantic.

Dr Tzimiropoulos’ research finds applications in face recognition, facial expression analysis and human behaviour understanding. In particular, prior to recognising someone’s identity or understanding his/her facial expressions, a computer program must be able to accurately detect and localise the facial parts like the mouth and the eyes, as well as track their deformable motion in video.

This very well-known computer vision problem, also known as face alignment, is a difficult one, especially when the faces to be analysed are captured in-the-wild, i.e. there is no control over illumination, image resolution, and head pose variations or occlusions. Dr Tzimiropoulos’ algorithm aims to address all of these challenging cases. A video with illustrative face tracking results can be found at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MjCSWTFBrFg

The second paper is ‘A Bayesian Framework for the Local Configuration of Retinal Junctions’ by Touseef Qureshi, Professor Andrew Hunter and Dr Bashir Al-Diri.

This focusses on the development of a probabilistic system to accurately configure the broken vessels in retinal images.

Retinal images provide an internal view of the human eye (retina) that contains forests of blood vessels. These vessels provide useful information which can be used for diagnosing several cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

Computer-based automated extraction of significant features from the retinal vessels can help early diagnostics of these diseases.

The correct configuration of broken vessels into trees of arteries and veins is a prerequisite for extracting significant information from the vasculature.

Touseef said: “We achieve remarkable results in the initial experiments and intend to develop fully automated diagnostic system in future. Moreover, the proposed system can be optimized for other applications such as biometric security systems and road extraction using aerial images.”

Touseef outside the conference centre
Touseef outside the conference centre
Touseef with academic poster
Touseef with academic poster

Detecting pain in cats

Feline Friends grantAnalysing cats’ facial expressions could lead to a major breakthrough in helping to alleviate feline suffering.

Computer vision expert Dr Georgios Tzimiropoulos, from the University of Lincoln, UK, has been pioneering the development of self-learning computer vision systems to aid the automatic detection of facial expressions.

Although the focus has been on humans, the technology will now be used to explore emotional expression in cats.

Derbyshire-based charity Feline Friends donated almost £400,000 for the research, which is aimed at detecting suffering earlier and possibly more subtle signs than has previously been possible, so that owners seek veterinary assistance sooner.

The idea is that by feeding the computer images of cats before and after treatment it will eventually start to pick out the key features that differentiate the two conditions.

Dr Tzimiropoulos will work with leading veterinary behaviourist Professor Daniel Mills, from the School of Life Sciences, who has been developing a clinical technique to help behaviourists identify the emotions of companion animals.

Professor Mills said: “This is a rare opportunity to systematically explore the emotional aspects of suffering in animals in new ways, with a view to developing more efficient early detection mechanisms. The multidisciplinary approach we will be using is ambitious, but has the potential to produce enormous rewards not just for those interested in feline welfare, but also animal welfare more broadly, as the methods we will be developing could be applied to any species.

“The translation of our findings into a usable resource is a major part of the project, so we can maximise the impact of our research. We are delighted that Feline Friends has had the courage and vision to make such a substantial investment in this pioneering work. We anticipate the project will take nearly five years to complete, but hope to be making useful contributions from an early stage within the research.”

Caroline Fawcett, of the charity Feline Friends, added: “Helping owners to better understand their feline companions, and the numerous ailments which beset them, has always been a paramount objective of our charity. Cats are notorious for not showing pain until their suffering becomes unbearable, and this visionary research may open our eyes in such a way that we can take much earlier action to relieve their suffering. The team at the University of Lincoln has demonstrated to us that they really do care about improving the welfare of our cats; and I believe that if anyone can succeed in breaking through the existing barriers to our knowledge then they can.”