Tag Archives: computer science

Upcoming Computer Science events for your diary!

Lincoln’s School of Computer Science announces FIVE upcoming events you’ll not want to miss.

hackathon

From a range of 24hr to 48hr hackathons, to a short four hour long event in collaboration with Google, this is a great opportunity for students of any experience to get involved, learn and have fun.

November 12th/13th – SoCS 24h Game Jam (12:00 Saturday to 12:00 Sunday +presentations & judging)

January 20th/21st/22nd48h Global Game Jam (17:00 Friday to 17:00 Sunday +presentations & judging)

February 11th/12th – SoCS Comp Sci based hackathon (12:00 Saturday to 12:00 Sunday +presentations & judging)

February 23rdGoogle Hash Code 4h hackathon (Thursday 17:30 to 21:30)

March 18th/19th – CanJam 24h Game Jam (12:00 Saturday to 12:00 Sunday +presentations & judging)

The School of Computer Science hosted events are free and open to all students and staff. Just turn up on the days and get involved.

The events with links are ticket-based via the websites. Book early to avoid disappointment.

We will be inviting external companies to our hackathon’s, if you want to get involved or know someone who does, get in touch on the email below.

Any further info is available via socstechnicians@lincoln.ac.uk

From 3D-printed blacksmith artefacts to proton therapy

LiGHTS Nights is coming to Lincoln and the School of Computer Science is putting on a variety of workshops and lectures you don’t want to miss.

Produce real blacksmith artefacts with the latest 3D-printer technology, find out how Lincoln research is improving proton therapy for cancer sufferers, and get up close and personal with our all-seeing robots, all for LiGHTS Nights on September 30th.

Computer Science does Lights Nights
Computer Science to showcase 3D printing, robotics and proton therapy research
More than 40 scientific workshops, talks and exhibitions will take place as part of the action-packed LiGHTS Nights (Lincoln – Get Hold of Tech and Science) event, which will invite people of all ages to learn more about research projects that are changing the world we live in today.
LiGHTS Nights – a celebration of how science and technology impacts on our daily lives –will take place on the University of Lincoln’s Brayford Pool campus and in venues across the city.
Visitors to LiGHTS Nights will be introduced to Lincoln’s ensemble cast of robots – the focus of exciting studies into artificial intelligence – and invited to experience the latest developments in Virtual Reality, the technology trend taking the world by storm.
Get 3D-printing real blacksmith artefacts from 12-6pm in the Minerva Building, Atrium with Dr John Murray.
A workshop called ‘See Humans Through a Robot’s Eyes’ will run at 1pm, 4pm and 7pm throughout the day in the LLMC Lecture Theatre, David Chiddick Building with Dr Marc Hanheide.
Professor Nigel Allinson will give an insightful talk into his Proton Therapy research: ‘A positive beam of hope for cancer treatments’ at 3pm in the Stephen Langton Lecture Theatre (Emmtec).
LiGHTS Nights is free to attend but bookings for individual sessions should be made in advance. More more information is available and bookings can be made online.

European Researchers’ Night is an annual Europe-wide initiative that takes place on the last Friday of September. The Lincoln showcase is one of more than 250 events occurring simultaneously in major cities across the continent this year, each inviting members of the public to meet ‘heroes of science’; the researchers from different disciplines whose work has the potential to change our world.

LiGHTS Nights will see academics from the University’s Colleges of Science, Arts and Social Science present their pioneering studies and invite visitors to become scientists for the day by participating in a range of different activities and experiments.

The programme of events, which features exhibitions, tours, public lectures, workshops, screenings and performances, begins at 11am and runs until 10pm. Visitors are encouraged to attend several events and make the most of the variety of activities on offer.

Read the full article here

 

Simplify travelling round Lincoln with Lincoln Bus

Travelling on a bus in Lincoln just got easier thanks to a website created by a University of Lincoln student.

Lincoln Bus Website

Lincoln Bus has been created by third year Computer Science student Jacob Ellis and is an all-in-one bus timetable viewer for travelling around Lincoln. The website hopes to help people check all bus services, routes and departure and arrival times.

Jacob Ellis said: “Lincoln Bus does the work for you, select your bus service and your current location and then it will show you an estimated time for your next bus, plus all other bus departures from your location throughout the day.

“Bus timetables can often be confusing especially with long haul journeys or services where departures are at different times on different days of the week.”

Jacob built the site using the programming skills he’d learnt during his Computer Science degree and says it’s helped him to set up the bus timetable database and website.

“There’s a lot of programming in Computer Science and as such the course has taught me how to teach myself other programming languages.” He said.

Lincoln Bus is predominantly programmed in PHP for web browsers, but I hope to release an Android app later. The database was made using SQL and the data is displayed to the user using SQL queries buried in PHP code.”

lincolnbus2

The website gives you the option to find bus routes depending on your location and you can choose whether you’re travelling from Lincoln or to the city.

The Lincoln Bus logo, created by Fine Art and Illustration student Bryony Loveridge, features the Lincoln skyline including the Cathedral, Lincoln Castle and other city landmarks.

The site gives you a variety of bus routes all in one place, and clicking on this with your location will give you the next bus time and the rest of the services for that day.

Jacob added: “My website recognises days of the week. So, for example if it is a Sunday, the estimated time box will display only the Sunday service timings throughout the day with the code ‘S’ to remind users that this journey is applicable only on a Sunday.

“Sometimes a bus service doesn’t run its full route. For example, the Service 1 Lincoln to Grantham at every other iteration goes as far as Wellingore, sometimes only Waddington if it’s a Sunday. In cases like this, Lincoln Bus will display a message such as WADDINGTON ONLY to show users that their next bus is not a full service.”

The website is currently in beta testing stage, but all Lincoln bus services will be added over the next few months along with new features users are to look forward too.

“The Journey Planner feature would allow the user to see their bus services and departures timings for multiple locations. For bus users new to the bus services in Lincoln, I am planning to add a feature whereby they select their location and the website displays which bus service they need as currently the user will need to know their bus service to make use of the website. This will be added as part of the Journey Planner.”

Jacob even hopes to include traffic information from Google to improve the estimated arrival and departure times in case of Lincoln congestion.

Great work Jacob – check out the site here and catch your bus with Lincolnbus.co.uk  

Presenting the future of proton therapy

A leading scientist making major strides in medical imaging, which could make proton therapy a viable treatment for many more cancer sufferers, will present his latest findings – including a new type of proton imaging – at a prestigious conference next month.

PRaVDA2 sml
Professor Nigel Allinson MBE, Distinguished Professor of Image Engineering at the University of Lincoln, UK, will appear among other world-leading experts at the Proton Therapy Congress in London this September.

Proton therapy is a form of radiation treatment that uses protons rather than x-rays to treat cancer. It has several benefits, including less radiation damage to the normal healthy tissues around the tumour and potential to deliver a higher radiation dose to the tumour (increasing the chances of destroying tumour cells). Proton therapy is particularly important in treating children.

The Congress will bring together researchers, clinicians, manufacturers and many more in the proton therapy sector to examine the future of proton therapy. It will take place in London on 20th-21st September 2016.

Nigel AllinsonProfessor Allinson, based in the School of Computer Science at the University of Lincoln, leads the groundbreaking PRaVDA (Proton Radiotherapy Verification and Dosimetry Applications) project. He and his multinational team are developing one of the most complex medical instruments ever imagined to improve the delivery of proton therapy.

The PRaVDA instrument is being designed to produce detailed 3D images of a patient’s anatomy using protons rather than x-rays, which has never been done before. To produce these Proton CT images, the world-first technology will use the same high energy particles that are used to destroy a tumour during proton therapy treatment.

Using protons to form an image of the patient will greatly improve the accuracy of the treatment. Using current methods, there could be a discrepancy of up to 1cm in terms of where the protons release most of their energy after passing through 20cm of healthy tissue. By using Proton CT, this margin for error can be reduced to just a one or two millimetres.

The PRaVDA researchers believe that Proton CT will soon be used as part of the planning process for cancer patients, as well as during and after treatment.

Click here to read the full article

More information on the PRaVDA presentation and the wider Proton Therapy Congress is available online.