Tag Archives: computer science

Simplify travelling round Lincoln with Lincoln Bus

Travelling on a bus in Lincoln just got easier thanks to a website created by a University of Lincoln student.

Lincoln Bus Website

Lincoln Bus has been created by third year Computer Science student Jacob Ellis and is an all-in-one bus timetable viewer for travelling around Lincoln. The website hopes to help people check all bus services, routes and departure and arrival times.

Jacob Ellis said: “Lincoln Bus does the work for you, select your bus service and your current location and then it will show you an estimated time for your next bus, plus all other bus departures from your location throughout the day.

“Bus timetables can often be confusing especially with long haul journeys or services where departures are at different times on different days of the week.”

Jacob built the site using the programming skills he’d learnt during his Computer Science degree and says it’s helped him to set up the bus timetable database and website.

“There’s a lot of programming in Computer Science and as such the course has taught me how to teach myself other programming languages.” He said.

Lincoln Bus is predominantly programmed in PHP for web browsers, but I hope to release an Android app later. The database was made using SQL and the data is displayed to the user using SQL queries buried in PHP code.”

lincolnbus2

The website gives you the option to find bus routes depending on your location and you can choose whether you’re travelling from Lincoln or to the city.

The Lincoln Bus logo, created by Fine Art and Illustration student Bryony Loveridge, features the Lincoln skyline including the Cathedral, Lincoln Castle and other city landmarks.

The site gives you a variety of bus routes all in one place, and clicking on this with your location will give you the next bus time and the rest of the services for that day.

Jacob added: “My website recognises days of the week. So, for example if it is a Sunday, the estimated time box will display only the Sunday service timings throughout the day with the code ‘S’ to remind users that this journey is applicable only on a Sunday.

“Sometimes a bus service doesn’t run its full route. For example, the Service 1 Lincoln to Grantham at every other iteration goes as far as Wellingore, sometimes only Waddington if it’s a Sunday. In cases like this, Lincoln Bus will display a message such as WADDINGTON ONLY to show users that their next bus is not a full service.”

The website is currently in beta testing stage, but all Lincoln bus services will be added over the next few months along with new features users are to look forward too.

“The Journey Planner feature would allow the user to see their bus services and departures timings for multiple locations. For bus users new to the bus services in Lincoln, I am planning to add a feature whereby they select their location and the website displays which bus service they need as currently the user will need to know their bus service to make use of the website. This will be added as part of the Journey Planner.”

Jacob even hopes to include traffic information from Google to improve the estimated arrival and departure times in case of Lincoln congestion.

Great work Jacob – check out the site here and catch your bus with Lincolnbus.co.uk  

Presenting the future of proton therapy

A leading scientist making major strides in medical imaging, which could make proton therapy a viable treatment for many more cancer sufferers, will present his latest findings – including a new type of proton imaging – at a prestigious conference next month.

PRaVDA2 sml
Professor Nigel Allinson MBE, Distinguished Professor of Image Engineering at the University of Lincoln, UK, will appear among other world-leading experts at the Proton Therapy Congress in London this September.

Proton therapy is a form of radiation treatment that uses protons rather than x-rays to treat cancer. It has several benefits, including less radiation damage to the normal healthy tissues around the tumour and potential to deliver a higher radiation dose to the tumour (increasing the chances of destroying tumour cells). Proton therapy is particularly important in treating children.

The Congress will bring together researchers, clinicians, manufacturers and many more in the proton therapy sector to examine the future of proton therapy. It will take place in London on 20th-21st September 2016.

Nigel AllinsonProfessor Allinson, based in the School of Computer Science at the University of Lincoln, leads the groundbreaking PRaVDA (Proton Radiotherapy Verification and Dosimetry Applications) project. He and his multinational team are developing one of the most complex medical instruments ever imagined to improve the delivery of proton therapy.

The PRaVDA instrument is being designed to produce detailed 3D images of a patient’s anatomy using protons rather than x-rays, which has never been done before. To produce these Proton CT images, the world-first technology will use the same high energy particles that are used to destroy a tumour during proton therapy treatment.

Using protons to form an image of the patient will greatly improve the accuracy of the treatment. Using current methods, there could be a discrepancy of up to 1cm in terms of where the protons release most of their energy after passing through 20cm of healthy tissue. By using Proton CT, this margin for error can be reduced to just a one or two millimetres.

The PRaVDA researchers believe that Proton CT will soon be used as part of the planning process for cancer patients, as well as during and after treatment.

Click here to read the full article

More information on the PRaVDA presentation and the wider Proton Therapy Congress is available online.

Fully funded MSc by Research in Computer Science – Apply now

Get a fully-funded MSc by Research in Computer Science at the University of Lincoln.

IMG_2445

Two scholarships are on offer for this one year course in collaboration between the University of Lincoln and Samsung Electronics. Funding will cover your tuition fees and a salary of £14,400 p/yr. 

Your research project will be part of a larger industry-academia project that will develop a state-of-the-art spoken dialogue system using machine learning techniques—deep learning in particular.

The candidates should posses excellent programming skills in the most popular programming languages, good background of mathematics, and knowledge (experience desirable) of machine learning with special focus on supervised and reinforcement learning.

You will be responsible for contributing to the development of the targeted machine learning framework, to its application for speech-based information-seeking systems, and to system evaluation in both simulation and realistic environments.

The MSc students will be supervised by Dr Heriberto Cuayáhuitl at the School of Computer Science, with potential co-supervision from the Lincoln Centre for Autonomous Systems. Positions will be based at the University of Lincoln with the opportunity to spend a short time at Samsung Electronics in Seoul, South Korea.

While these positions are open to overseas applicants, funding will only be available up to the UK/EU fee rates. Overseas students will be responsible for self-funding for the remainder tuition fees.

Applications close 4th August 2016 (or until the position is filled) Interview Notifications on 5th August and interviews are to be held on the 8th August.

Requirements

  • You must have a high standard undergraduate degree at UK 1st class or 2:1 level (or international equivalent)
  • You must be fluent in spoken and written English; Non-native speakers of English who did not study in an English speaking country will be required to have IELTS 6 with a minimum of 5.5 in each element.
  • You must have excellent communication skills and be able to organise your own work and prioritise work to meet deadlines
  • Strong academic track record and practical software skills are desired

    How to apply

    If you wish to discuss any details of the project informally, please contact Dr Heriberto Cuayahuitl . All applications must be sent to PGR Mailbox with the subject field: “[Msc-2016-Lincoln-Deep-Learning]” Applications must include the following:

  • Full CV, with a list of any significant course projects and/or industrial experience
  • A 2-page research statement indicating what you see are interesting research issues

    relating to the above MSc topic description and why your expertise is relevant

  • Academic transcripts/grades

    Applications will be assessed as they arrive. Selected applicants will then be encouraged to submit a formal application online via the relevant website.

     

     

     

     

    For further information about the School of Computer Science, please visit: www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/socs/

    For information about the Lincoln Centre for Autonomous Systems (L-CAS) research activities, please visit: https://lcas.lincoln.ac.uk/wp/

Postdoc to give a talk at a world-leading AI lab in America

A School of Computer Science STRANDS postdoc has been invited to give a presentation at a world-leading Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab in the USA.

Dr Tomas Krajnik, in L-CAS will give a talk next week at MIT: Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in Cambridge, USA on ‘FreMEn: Frequency Map Enhancement for Long-Term Autonomy of Mobile Robots’.

Tom is a research fellow at the Lincoln Center of Autonomous Systems. He has a PhD degree in Artificial Intelligence and Biocybernetics from the Czech Technical University, Prague, Czech Republic, in 2012. His research interests include long-term autonomy, robot vision and aerial robotics.

This is an amazing opportunity for him to present the work of the STRANDS project to an American audience and we will keep you informed on how the talk goes.

Abstract:

While robotic mapping of static environments has been widely studied,life-long mapping in non-stationary environments is still an open problem. We present an approach for long-term representation of natural environments, where many of the observed changes are caused by pseudo-periodic factors, such as seasonal variations, or humans performing their daily chores.

Rather than using a fixed probability value, our method models the uncertainty of the elementary environment states by their frequency spectra. This allows to integrate sparse and irregular observations obtained during long-term deployments of mobile robots into memory-efficient models that reflect the recurring patterns of activity in the environment.

The frequency-enhanced spatio-temporal models allow to predict the future environment states, which improves the efficiency of mobile robot operation in changing environments. In a series of
experiments performed over periods of weeks to years, we demonstrate that the proposed approach improves mobile robot localization, path and task planning, activity recognition and allows for life-long spatio-temporal exploration.

STRANDS

Digital technology and autism: collusion or communication

lincoln1

Bringing together the School of Computer Science and the School of Psychology Seminar on a seminar on ‘Digital worlds and autism: collusion or communication?’

The talk given by Dr Sarah Parsons (Southampton Education School, University of Southampton) will take place today at 4 – 5pm, Co-op Lecture Theatre, Minerva Building. Refreshments from 3.45pm. We look forward to seeing you there.

Recent media headlines have raised concerns about children’s use of personal technologies. Similar concerns were raised when researchers started to investigate the educational potential of technologies for children with autism, suggesting that there was a danger for children to become addicted and reluctant to re-enter the real world. 

Thus, the accusation – then and now – is that technologies create ‘digital bubbles’ that surround the user, such that the child is then less engaged with the ‘real world’, with potentially detrimental effects.

For children on the autism spectrum, who are diagnosed according to the existence of social and communication difficulties, the implied accusation is even stronger: that by using technologies for supporting learning we are somehow colluding with children’s disability.

This talk will take a critical look at this argument and present evidence that suggests a more positive role for technology in the lives of people with autism.