Tag Archives: cancer treatment

Less than 100 images – Gravity Fields festival 2016

Professor Nigel Allinson, Distinguished Chair of Image Engineering at the University of Lincoln, will deliver a fascinating talk as part of the pioneering Gravity Fields festival.

Gravity Fields Festival 2016
Professor Nigel Allinson to talk proton therapy at Gravity Fields Festival
  • Date: Saturday 24th September 2016
  • Time: 1:30pm
  • Venue: Woolsthorpe Manor
  • Ticket Price: £6 (£5)
  • Suitable for age 14+
  • Book your place online

Based in Grantham, Gravity Fields explores the physical sciences through science, arts and heritage events and celebrates the area’s close links with one of the world’s greatest thinkers, Sir Isaac Newton.

Professor Allinson – who leads the ground-breaking PRaVDA medical imagining project which aims to make proton therapy a viable treatment for many more cancer sufferers – will invite festival goers to take a fascinating look at imagery throughout history.

Images are everywhere with nearly 150,000 images posted on Facebook every minute. Professor Allinson’s talk, Less Than 100 Images, will begin in 10th century Basra in Iraq. He will talk his audience through some local heroes (not just Newton, but also a medieval bishop and a humble engineer), to what the future holds; from seeing around corners to holographic television in a tour de force of entertainment and education.

Less Than 100 Images takes place at Woolsthorpe Manor, the birthplace of Sir Isaac Newton, at 1:30pm on Saturday 24th September 2016. Places can be booked online.

Inspired by the genius of Sir Isaac Newton, the Gravity Fields festival has special significance in 2016; the 350thanniversary of his ‘Year of Wonders’  – or ‘Annus Mirabilis’ – of huge scientific advances with his work  on light, mathematics and gravitational forces.

The festival commemorates 1666, the year Newton spent at his Lincolnshire birthplace at Woolsthorpe Manor having fled the plague in Cambridge.

A packed programme of  science, arts, heritage, music, drama and outdoor events  takes the theme of ‘Genius’ to celebrate Newton’s legacy,  ranging from the dazzling LED umbrellas of international creative artists Cirque Bijou to the genius engineers of WW2.

Presenting the future of proton therapy

A leading scientist making major strides in medical imaging, which could make proton therapy a viable treatment for many more cancer sufferers, will present his latest findings – including a new type of proton imaging – at a prestigious conference next month.

PRaVDA2 sml
Professor Nigel Allinson MBE, Distinguished Professor of Image Engineering at the University of Lincoln, UK, will appear among other world-leading experts at the Proton Therapy Congress in London this September.

Proton therapy is a form of radiation treatment that uses protons rather than x-rays to treat cancer. It has several benefits, including less radiation damage to the normal healthy tissues around the tumour and potential to deliver a higher radiation dose to the tumour (increasing the chances of destroying tumour cells). Proton therapy is particularly important in treating children.

The Congress will bring together researchers, clinicians, manufacturers and many more in the proton therapy sector to examine the future of proton therapy. It will take place in London on 20th-21st September 2016.

Nigel AllinsonProfessor Allinson, based in the School of Computer Science at the University of Lincoln, leads the groundbreaking PRaVDA (Proton Radiotherapy Verification and Dosimetry Applications) project. He and his multinational team are developing one of the most complex medical instruments ever imagined to improve the delivery of proton therapy.

The PRaVDA instrument is being designed to produce detailed 3D images of a patient’s anatomy using protons rather than x-rays, which has never been done before. To produce these Proton CT images, the world-first technology will use the same high energy particles that are used to destroy a tumour during proton therapy treatment.

Using protons to form an image of the patient will greatly improve the accuracy of the treatment. Using current methods, there could be a discrepancy of up to 1cm in terms of where the protons release most of their energy after passing through 20cm of healthy tissue. By using Proton CT, this margin for error can be reduced to just a one or two millimetres.

The PRaVDA researchers believe that Proton CT will soon be used as part of the planning process for cancer patients, as well as during and after treatment.

Click here to read the full article

More information on the PRaVDA presentation and the wider Proton Therapy Congress is available online.