Category Archives: L-CAS

Gregory Epps to Demonstrate DogBot at Research Seminar

The Lincoln Centre for Autonomous Systems (L-CAS) and Lincoln Institute for Agri-Food Technology (LIAT) will welcome CEO of React AI, Gregory Epps, and ‘DogBot’; a quadruped robot.

Gregory will discuss the exciting new robotic platform and the research behind it as well as providing a live demonstration of DogBot.

Screenshot_Adobe_Acrobat_20180516-185510

The seminar will be on Friday 18th May 2018, 11:00am, in AAD0W25.

Everybody is welcome to join!

DogBot is a quadruped robot built for AI research, built by AI and robotics experts with an eye on the future. It breaks free from the need for heavy, slow and rigid limbs by utilising ultra-light carbon fibre and 3D printed parts to complement powerful torque controlled motors. The robot uses real-time AI control, resulting in lifelike control and motion.
React Robotics will provide a platform for academic researchers to test their control algorithms in the real world. We are introducing the DogBot to the market at just £19,995+VAT, and we encourage you sign up to be notified when the DogBot will be available for pre-order.

Research Seminar: Robot Learning with an Unknown Reward Function

We are pleased to announce an exciting seminar by Robert Pinsler (Cambridge University).  He will visit us on Wednesday, 11/4/2018 and give a talk at 2pm in INB3102.

Robot Learning with an Unknown Reward Function

Robert PinslerWhile reinforcement learning has led to promising results in robotics, defining an informative reward function often remains challenging. In this talk, I will give an overview about different reward learning approaches and how they can be used for learning robotics policies in practice. In particular, I will present an efficient hierarchical reinforcement learning approach for learning how to grasp objects from preferences. Furthermore, I will show how inverse reinforcement learning can be used to learn flocking behavior of birds, which could potentially be used for apprenticeship learning of robot swarms.

University of Lincoln joins network of leading UK robotics research centres

The University of Lincoln has been added to a growing national network of the UK’s leading robotics research centres.

The Lincoln Centre for Autonomous Systems Research has joined the UK Robotics and Autonomous Systems Network (UK-RAS Network). The network was established in 2015 by the UK’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council to provide academic leadership in Robotics and Autonomous Systems (RAS), expand collaboration with industry and integrate and coordinate activities between research centres.

UKRASNetwork
The UK Government has identified robotics and autonomous systems as a priority area which can help drive international competitiveness, productivity and economic growth.

The UK-RAS Network organises a wide range of activities including UK Robotics Week, networking events, focused workshops, public engagement and exhibitions. Other network member universities include Imperial College London, the University of Oxford and the University of Manchester.

The Lincoln Centre for Autonomous Systems (L-CAS) is based in the School of Computer Science at the University of Lincoln. Its researchers participate in a range of collaborative research projects with other academic and industry partners. The centre specialises in technologies for perception, learning, decision-making, control and interaction in autonomous systems, especially mobile robots and robotic manipulators, and the integration of these capabilities in sectors such as agri-food, healthcare, intelligent transportation and logistics.

Thorvald, the Agri-Food robot.
Thorvald, the Agri-Food robot.

Professor Tom Duckett, Director of L-CAS at the University of Lincoln, said: “We are very pleased to have joined the UK-RAS Network, which brings together the UK’s leading academic research centres for robotics and autonomous systems. We believe the University brings some unique specialisms to the network through our particular expertise, facilities and approach to working with industry. By nature robotics research tends to be collaborative and inter-disciplinary in scope, so the network can only help the UK emerge as a world leader in developing and exploiting these technologies.”

Major L-CAS research projects include ENRICHME, which is developing next-generation mobile service robots to help elderly people to stay independent and active for longer, and ILIAD, which will introduce fleets of autonomous ‘self-optimising’ forklift trucks which can operate safely and efficiently in warehouses alongside human co-workers. The centre also contributes to the inter-disciplinary research of the Lincoln Institute for Agri-food Technology and the Lincoln Institute for Health.

Research facilities include dedicated robotics research labs in the University’s new Isaac Newton Building, a demonstration farm at the Riseholme Campus, and an experimental food factory at the National Centre for Food Manufacturing in Holbeach.

Teams also have access to a fleet of diverse mobile and social robots, advanced compliant robotic manipulators, a swarm of micro robots, and state-of-the-art agricultural robots, including the Thorvald platform.

Article re-blogged from: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/news/2018/01/1428.asp